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Using a theme to focus on for the new year


If the idea of focusing on something to change in the new year is appealing to you but resolutions aren't, try an area of focus or a them instead.


Resolutions are a popular way to goal set for the coming year. They don't often work for people especially when they are vague and lack planning of smaller, more manageable steps to help get to the finish line.


No resolutions or special beginning of the year goals are required, and I don't want anyone to feel pressured to make them because often, when resolutions fail--often early in the year--it can make the resolution maker feel like a failure.


One option I enjoy as an alternative to a resolution is using a focus or theme. Here are some possible themes.


Homeostasis

All living systems tend towards homeostasis--the state of stability. Humans are also striving to maintain the state of balance and comfort.


Acceptance

Acceptance is about observing what is present and letting it be without judgement. Acceptance doesn't mean living with what we don't want just acknowledging what is as a first step towards any next step.



Regulation and co-regulation

Regulation is an action that we take to achieve and maintain homeostasis. Co-regulation is often discussed in terms of parenting and caring for children, but in truth, we all co-regulate. Other people's moods and actions impact our own. This can be a wonderful tool for peace and connection to others.



Presence

Be here now, if it's safe to do so.



Simplicity

I recently wrote a blog on "stuff," and I believe in the power of decluttering. A focus on simplicity is about freeing up space for other things that matter. Less stuff is a part of this focus, but it also includes reducing our stressors, obligations, and just doing less.




Whether you decide to use a focus or have a resolution for 2023 or not, you deserve to have a year of peace and healing.





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